Biomedical Engineering 7-28

Biomedical Engineering 7-28

Students began the day with a discussion of how fluid mechanics played a role in the design of their heart models, and also discussed how the heart compared to other kinds of pumps. Next, they were given the chance to reflect on the design process of their BristleBots, which they had been working on all week. As a class, students put the finishing touches on the big heart model, and worked together to label the parts of the heart. They also prepared to present all of their projects to the parents at the end of the day.

Ask your student: Which parts of your BristleBot design were most effective? Which material would be the most versatile for building a BristleBot?

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Biomedical Engineering 7-27

Biomedical Engineering 7-27

Today, students discussed what can be done to prevent different kinds of heart failure, and what is done to troubleshoot both electrical and mechanical failure. The class finished constructing the big heart model and double checked to make sure it was fully functional. Students reflected on the process of designing, building and troubleshooting the large heart model, and came up with any last minute changes to refine the design. Finally, students continued working on and testing their BristleBots.

Ask your student: What are some ways to prevent heart failure? What can be done to troubleshoot an electrical system failure? What role did pressure play in the design of the big heart model?

Biomedical Engineering, Wednesday, 7-26

Biomedical Engineering, Wednesday, 7-26

To begin the day, students learned about and discussed examples of heart failure, both in the mechanical and electrical systems of the heart. Then, the class continued to build the large heart model, and began troubleshooting any issues that came up for the big heart. Students continued to work on their BristleBots, and began testing them today.

Ask your student: What are some examples of an electrical heart failure? What are examples of a mechanical heart failur

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e? How does heart failure affect blood flow?

Biomedical Engineering 7-26

Biomedical Engineering 7-26

To begin the day, students learned about and discussed examples of heart failure, both in the mechanical and electrical systems of the heart. Then, the class continued to build the large heart model, and began troubleshooting any issues that came up for the big heart. Students continued to work on their BristleBots, and began testing them today.

Ask your student: What are some examples of an electrical heart failure? What are examples of a mechanical heart failure? How does heart failure affect blood flow?

Biomedical Engineering 7-25

Biomedical Engineering 7-25

Students continued their exploration of the human heart, and finished constructing their life size models. After construction, they were able to troubleshoot any issues their model had, and reflect on the process of designing and constructing the heart. Using what they learned from building their individual heart models, the students worked together as a class to design and construct a large heart model, about 10 times the size of an actual heart. Next, students continued their exploration of range of motion, this time measuring each joint after 30 minutes of exercise. The last activity for today was continuing construction of the BristleBot, which was started yesterday.

Ask your student: What went well when you were building your heart model? What things did not work as you planned? How did you apply this knowledge to building the large class model of the heart?

Biomedical Engineering, Tuesday, 7-25

Biomedical Engineering, Tuesday, 7-25

Students continued their exploration of the human heart, and finished constructing their life size models. After construction, they were able to troubleshoot any issues their model had, and reflect on the process of designing and constructing the heart. Using what they learned from building their individual heart models, the students worked together as a class to design and construct a large heart model, about 10 times the size of an actual heart. Next, students continued their exploration of range of motion, this time measuring each joint after 30 minutes of exercise. The last activity for today was continuing construction of the BristleBot, which was started yesterday.

Ask your student: What went well when you were building your heart model? What things did not work as you planned? How did you apply this knowledge to building the large class model of the heart?

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Biomedical Engineering 7-24

Biomedical Engineering 7-24

Today, students did a wide variety of activities, beginning with learning about the basics of engineering. Next, students learned the important components of a human heart and how they function, and they began designing and building their own life size model of a heart. Students also examined different foot types, and were able to determine which foot type they have. Using a goniometer, students were able to measure their own range of motion for different joints in their body. The last activity of the day was designing and building a Bristle-Bot – a robot made from toothbrush bristles! Some students built a solar powered bot, while others worked on light tracking robots so the class could compare and contrast these two types of Bristle-Bots.

Ask your student: How do the electrical and mechanical systems of the human heart work together to make it function properly? How does the performance of a solar powered device change with different weather conditions? How does the performance of a battery powered device change with different weather conditions?

Biomedical Engineering @ IMSA

Biomedical Engineering @ IMSA

Innovate through engineering and physiology! This course will begin with an introduction to the foundations of engineering, including classification and applications.

Students will focus on biomedical engineering, learning about heart physiology and differentiating between the mechanical and electrical parts of the heart as well as cardiac circulation.

They will then use biophysical principles such as Poiseuille’s equation to design their model. The next step will be building a working heart model which can pump “blood” using tubes and assorted pumping methods of their choice.

The week will culminate with the participants presenting their creations at a showcase for parents.

Summer 2017 is Almost Here!

Summer 2017 is Almost Here!

We are gearing up for summer 2017 and we are so excited to have all of you!

As we get closer to the start of our programs, here is some information that might be helpful to you.

Day Programs:

  • The program day begins at 8:30 a.m. and runs to 3:00 p.m. Morning drop-off/check in begins at 8:15 a.m. – and concludes at 8:30 a.m. Do NOT drop your child off prior to 8:15, as there will be so supervision available before this time.
  • Monday morning check-in: On the first day of the program, it is mandatory for parents to park and walk their participant to the summer program staff for first-day check-in. Your child will be assigned to a group leader who will be their same leader throughout the week.
  • Lunch is included in the program fee and provided through our food service, Sodexho. They offer many options for students, including burgers, macaroni and cheese, a salad bar, fresh fruit, and many other items. You may choose to send your child with a sack lunch if you prefer. Please note: the cafeteria is NOT a peanut free environment.
  • Pick up is promptly at 3:00 PM. We do not provide extended care. Please be timely and prompt with drop off and pick up for the best and safest experience for every participant.  Our personnel need to prepare for the next day after day programs end at 3:00 p.m.
  • Late Pickup Fee:  IMSA day programs end at 3 p.m.  Any parent/guardian picking up a child late will be assessed a fee of $15 per child for any pickup 15 minutes late and $1 per minute thereafter. Late fees are due on the child’s next day of camp.

Residential Programs:

  • Residential program check-in begins at 6:00 PM on the Sunday before the program start date. The entrance will change based on which dorms the students will be in. Please make note of this in your pre-program email!
  • Please plan on arriving to pick up your child between 1:45-1:55 p.m. the following Friday(the last day of the program). There will be a 30 minute program presentation/wrap-up starting promptly at 2:00 pm.
  • We do not honor requests to pair or group friends or relatives during their class during the day; however, they will have the opportunity to mingle during common activities such as lunch and free time.  Program participants are grouped at random to encourage a positive learning experience, meeting new friends while engaging in program activities.
  • We DO take requests for roommates. Friends or relatives (of the same gender) can be paired as roommates if both parties request each other by sending an email to us a studentenrichment@imsa.edu. Please include the program name and week offered, your child’s name, and the name of the child being requested as a roommate. We must receive this at least 10 days before the first date of your program to accommodate it.
  • Your child will be assigned to a group leader who will be their same leader throughout the week.