Vital Signs @ Springfield – Friday: Animatronic Extremity

Vital Signs @ Springfield – Friday: Animatronic Extremity

Throughout the week, students have been exploring the realm of artificial prosthetics through the use of their own engineering creativity. Our bold inventors have created their own artificial hands, improving them day by day, and testing them with games and activities. Experiments involved carrying ping-pong balls, and even sign language!

Students have become experts at analyzing design solutions and repeatedly testing them in order to determine the best way to improve the product.

Ask your student:

What is electromyography, and how do modern prosthetics take advantage of it? (voluntary signals that contract muscles, prosthetics can be controlled using remaining nerve endings)

Ask them to show some of the sign language they learned this week!

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Vital Signs @ Springfield – Thursday: The Blood Part 1

Vital Signs @ Springfield – Thursday: The Blood Part 1

Today, our scientists delved into the study of blood type and the genetics that help determine it. Students first discovered the physical basis behind the ABO blood type group, analyzing different antigens. In the lab, they attempted to determine the blood type of different samples by creating antibody reactions.

The analysts-in-training also learned the basics of Mendelian genetics, discovering how blood type traits are inherited and why some are dominant over others.

Ask your student:

How many total possibilities are there for blood type? (there are 8 including both genes: A+/-, B+/-, AB+/-, and O+/-)

What is one method to predict the blood type of the offspring when you know that of the parents? (use a Punnett square)

Vital Signs @ Springfield – Wednesday: Banana Sutures

Vital Signs @ Springfield – Wednesday: Banana Sutures

Today, our junior medical practitioners performed their first procedure! Students practiced sutures (or “stitches”) the same way that real doctors practice: on banana peels. They primarily investigated the layered nature of the skin, and how it relates to its main function: protection. Some students were surprised to learn that our skin is actually the largest organ in our bodies!

Our fledgling scientists will continue to use their rapidly developing medical skills in the days to come!

 

Ask your student:

What are the names of the three layers of the skin? (epidermis, dermis, and hypodermis)

What layer of the skin is the thickest? (hypodermis – 26 mm)

Vital Signs @ Springfield – Tuesday: Sheep Heart Dissection

Vital Signs @ Springfield – Tuesday: Sheep Heart Dissection

Day 2 is over, and our daring dissectors have had an in-depth look at the workings of every mammal’s most important organ: the heart! During their exploration, students continued to recognize the relationship between structure and function that is present everywhere in biological structures. One student commented, “Every piece of the organ has a specific job, and everything is efficient!”

The scientists-in-training will continue to explore this connection between structure and function as the week goes on!

Ask your student:

What are the jobs of the atria and ventricles of the heart? (Atria take blood from body back into the heart; ventricles pump blood to lungs and then back to the body.)

What is the difference between a vein and an artery? ( arteries carry blood away from the heart; veins carry blood to the heart)

Vital Signs @ Springfield – Monday: Chicken Wing Thing

Vital Signs @ Springfield – Monday: Chicken Wing Thing

On the first day of a jam-packed week, students delved into anatomy by learning the basics of dissection! Our budding scientists explored the structures of a chicken wing, discovering characteristics that are shared with the human arm. As they examined deeper levels of complexity during their dissection, they observed the interactions between systems and structures that allow the wing to function.

Students also learned how to preserve the bones of the chicken wing in order to use them in one of Friday’s lessons!

 

Ask your student:

What is the difference between the flexor and extensor muscles? (They work together to move the arm/wing, flexor curls the limb, extensor extends it)

What are the two bones of the lower arm/wing? (radius and ulna)

Vital Signs @ McKendree – Friday: Animatronic Extremity

Vital Signs @ McKendree – Friday: Animatronic Extremity

Throughout the week, students have been exploring the realm of artificial prosthetics through the use of their own engineering creativity. Our bold inventors have created their own artificial hands, improving them day by day, and testing them with games and activities. Experiments involved carrying ping-pong balls, and even sign language!

Students have become experts at analyzing design solutions and repeatedly testing them in order to determine the best way to improve the product.

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Ask your student:

What is electromyography, and how do modern prosthetics take advantage of it? (voluntary signals that contract muscles, prosthetics can be controlled using remaining nerve endings)

Ask them to show some of the sign language they learned this week!

Guest Speaker at McKendree

Dr. Bowden, Guest Speaker at McKendree

Dr. Bowden was our guest speaker on Thursday. He spoke about assessing injuries and determining the need for an x-ray-a great follow up from yesterday‘s lesson on breaks, sprains, and strains. We can’t thank him enough!

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