E^2: Engineering Explorations

E^2: Engineering Explorations

Design, tinker, build, test—then do it again!

Working in teams, participants will engage in hands-on activities as they explore the engineering design process through electrical, chemical, and biomedical engineering!

Students will design, build, and race boats, experiment with the chemical engineering behind solar homes, perform a calculator dissection to understand circuits from the inside out, and tackle the concept of robotic surgery as they make their own Bristlebot!

MYTHconceptions

MYTHconceptions

What’s the truth behind the 5-second rule? Does it really take 7 years for us to digest a piece of gum? Do Energy drinks really contain energy?

This program will use real science, experiments, and data collection and analysis, to get to the bottom of these and other notions that are widely assumed to be true, but may actually be false. Or are they, in fact, true?

The week will culminate with students running an experiment of their own design to test their own myth! Join us we put a wide array of MYTHconceptions to the scientific test.

Summer 2017 is Almost Here!

Summer 2017 is Almost Here!

We are gearing up for summer 2017 and we are so excited to have all of you!

As we get closer to the start of our programs, here is some information that might be helpful to you.

Day Programs:

  • The program day begins at 8:30 a.m. and runs to 3:00 p.m. Morning drop-off/check in begins at 8:15 a.m. – and concludes at 8:30 a.m. Do NOT drop your child off prior to 8:15, as there will be so supervision available before this time.
  • Monday morning check-in: On the first day of the program, it is mandatory for parents to park and walk their participant to the summer program staff for first-day check-in. Your child will be assigned to a group leader who will be their same leader throughout the week.
  • Lunch is included in the program fee and provided through our food service, Sodexho. They offer many options for students, including burgers, macaroni and cheese, a salad bar, fresh fruit, and many other items. You may choose to send your child with a sack lunch if you prefer. Please note: the cafeteria is NOT a peanut free environment.
  • Pick up is promptly at 3:00 PM. We do not provide extended care. Please be timely and prompt with drop off and pick up for the best and safest experience for every participant.  Our personnel need to prepare for the next day after day programs end at 3:00 p.m.
  • Late Pickup Fee:  IMSA day programs end at 3 p.m.  Any parent/guardian picking up a child late will be assessed a fee of $15 per child for any pickup 15 minutes late and $1 per minute thereafter. Late fees are due on the child’s next day of camp.

Residential Programs:

  • Residential program check-in begins at 6:00 PM on the Sunday before the program start date. The entrance will change based on which dorms the students will be in. Please make note of this in your pre-program email!
  • Please plan on arriving to pick up your child between 1:45-1:55 p.m. the following Friday(the last day of the program). There will be a 30 minute program presentation/wrap-up starting promptly at 2:00 pm.
  • We do not honor requests to pair or group friends or relatives during their class during the day; however, they will have the opportunity to mingle during common activities such as lunch and free time.  Program participants are grouped at random to encourage a positive learning experience, meeting new friends while engaging in program activities.
  • We DO take requests for roommates. Friends or relatives (of the same gender) can be paired as roommates if both parties request each other by sending an email to us a studentenrichment@imsa.edu. Please include the program name and week offered, your child’s name, and the name of the child being requested as a roommate. We must receive this at least 10 days before the first date of your program to accommodate it.
  • Your child will be assigned to a group leader who will be their same leader throughout the week.

C.S.IMSA – Friday: Drops to DNA Part 2

C.S.IMSA  – Friday: Drops to DNA Part 2

The case has been cracked! Our junior forensic scientists worked in the lab today in order to extract DNA from the pieces of a broken vase that were found at the crime scene. After analyzing the evidence and comparing it to the DNA samples from several key suspects, the CSI team has identified the culprit!

Students concluded the week with a successfully cracked case, and experience with real CSI science!

Ask your student:

Were your suspicions from earlier in the week correct? If not, what evidence changed them?

C.S.IMSA @ Springfield – Thursday: Drops to DNA Part 1

C.S.IMSA @ Springfield – Thursday: Drops to DNA Part 1

Today our CSI technicians began what will be a two day process to extract DNA from a broken vase found at the crime scene. In order to prepare themselves to discover what should be the most convincing piece of evidence, students learned about the extraction process by using their own DNA!

After their training, investigators are ready to process the last piece of evidence tomorrow!

Ask your student:

What was one substance you used in the extraction of your own DNA? (Gatorade, soap, meat tenderizer, alcohol)

C.S.IMSA @ Sprinfield – Wednesday: Tie Dyes

C.S.IMSA @ Sprinfield – Wednesday: Tie Dyes

The crime scene team began analyzing a promising new lead today by testing oil samples found on the driveway at the crime scene and comparing them with oil samples from suspects’ driveways. Students discovered the uses for the science of chromatography by watching how different colors separate, and using that information to match the crime scene oil with a likely culprit.

Our forensic scientists are developing a clearer picture of the case, and feel close to a breakthrough!

Ask your student:

What is chromatography used for? (separating materials)

What new information did you learn from your evidence analysis today?

C.S.IMSA @ Springfield – Tuesday: Lift a Finger

C.S.IMSA @ Springfield – Tuesday: Lift a Finger

Our CSI team is well on its way to cracking the case! Today, the scientists-in-training delved into the study of fingerprints. They first fingerprinted themselves in order to learn about the different recognizable fingerprint patterns. Students then examined the fingerprint evidence collected from the crime scene and attempted to match it with prints collected later from suspects.

Our investigators have had a busy two days, but there is more forensic science to be done before the culprit can be apprehended!

Ask your student:

What are the three characteristic fingerprint patterns? (loops, whorls, and arches)

After two days, do you have any theories about the case?

CSImsa @ Springfield – Monday: Observation 101

CSImsa @ Springfield – Monday: Observation 101

The detectives have called in the CSI unit, and our junior forensic scientists are on the case! The investigation is well under way, with students honing their observation skills by spotting hidden objects in various pictures. They also practiced their mastery of memory and recall by seeing a series of objects and attempting to remember what was shown.

Investigators will continue to utilize their observational talent throughout the week as they attempt to solve the case!

Ask your student:

What evidence have you collected so far in the case?

How did you do in your observation and memory skills practice?