MYTHconceptions 7-28: Own Your Own Myth

MYTHconceptions 7-28: Own Your Own Myth

This week, students worked in groups to test their own myth. They used steps from the traditional scientific method in order to refute or support a claim. Today, students finalized their conclusions and shared their observations and results with the class. They made posters of their results and gave small presentations to the class.

Ask your student: What claim did your group test? Was it a myth?

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BONUS!

Check out all of our posters from proving/ disproving our myths!

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MYTHconceptions 7-27: It’s Poppin’

MYTHconceptions 7-27: It’s Poppin’

Have you ever heard someone say that you could pop popcorn using the electromagnetic waves from a couple cell phones? Well today we looked for evidence if this is true or not. The students set up a few sets of cell phones with a popcorn kernel to watch what would happen. They also compared the key parts of a popcorn kernel with a regular kernel. Did you know that they are completely different plants?

Ask your student: What did you think would happen in this experiment? What evidence supported the myth? What evidence did not support the myth?

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MYTHconceptions 7-26: Balloons

MYTHconceptions 7-26: Balloons

Today, in MYTHconceptions, the students were challenged to puncture a balloon without popping it. Students explored properties of rubber to figure out how to pierce a balloon with a wooden skewer without popping it. Through this activity students use their deductive skills to figure out what needs to be done to keep the balloon intact.

Ask your student: What is a polymer? (A Polymer is a chain of repeating parts) What property of the balloon (rubber) allowed it to be stretchy and always go back to the original form? (elasticity, elastic)

 

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MYTHconceptions 7-25: The 7 Year Wad

MYTHconceptions 7-25: The 7 Year Wad

Hubba Bubba party! Today the young scientists tested the popular myth: gum takes 7 years to digest in our stomachs. They chewed and chewed, and used vinegar to stimulate stomach acid. The chewed gum was compared to other unchewed gum and food we know our bodies easily digest, like bread. They used their new digestion vocabulary (mechanical and chemical processes) to examine what happens to gum in the mouth.

Ask your student: What happens to things that we eat that are indigestible? (they pass out the other end as solid waste— this mostly includes fiber from fruits and vegetables, but could include indigestible gum too) Does gum really stay in your system for 7 years? (No! On average, it takes 24-35 hours for food to be completely digested, and in this time the gum would be passed out with other indigestible food components).

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MYTHconceptions 7-24: Tablecloth Viola!

MYTHconceptions 7-24: Tablecloth Viola!

Today the students investigated if it was possible to magically pull a tablecloth off of a table so that everything on top of the tablecloth remains as it was. In order to understand the plausibility of this claim, students first learned about Newton’s first law of motion: objects tend to stay still if they are still or continue moving if they are moving. Students then planned, tested, and carried out various scenarios to remove a tablecloth without disrupting the table setting resting on it.

Ask your student: What happens to an object at rest if no force acts on it? (it stays at rest) Were you able to pull the tablecloth out without disrupting the objects on top of it?

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MYTHconceptions 6-30: Own Your Own Myth

MYTHconceptions 6-30: Own Your Own Myth

This week, students worked in groups to test their own myth. They used steps from the traditional scientific method in order to refute or support a claim. Today, students finalized their conclusions and shared their observations and results with the class. They made posters of their results and gave small presentations to the class.

Ask your student: What claim did your group test? Was it a myth?

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MYTHconceptions 6-29: An Explosion of Pop-Rocks

MYTHconceptions 6-29: An Explosion of Pop-Rocks

Have you ever heard someone say that if you eat Pop-Rocks and drink lots of soda at the same time, it will cause your stomach to explode? Well the students today tested this out! They used various types of soda, a packet of Pop-Rocks, and a balloon.  The students said it was exciting to see the balloons blow up from the released gasses in the Pop-Rocks and soda!

Ask your student: What gas was released from the Pop-Rocks and the soda? (Carbon Dioxide) What did you think would happen in this experiment? What evidence supported the myth? What evidence did not support the myth?

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MYTHconceptions 6-28: Balloons

MYTHconceptions 6-28: Balloons

Today, in MYTHconceptions, the students were challenged to puncture a balloon without popping it. Students explored properties of rubber to figure out how to pierce a balloon with a wooden skewer without popping it. Through this activity students use their deductive skills to figure out what needs to be done to keep the balloon intact.

Ask your student: What is a polymer? (A Polymer is a chain of repeating parts) What property of the balloon (rubber) allowed it to be stretchy and always go back to the original form? (elasticity, elastic)

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MYTHconceptions 6-27: The 7 Year Wad

MYTHconceptions 6-27: The 7 Year Wad

Hubba Bubba party! Today the young scientists tested the popular myth: gum takes 7 years to digest in our stomachs. They chewed and chewed, and used vinegar to stimulate stomach acid. The chewed gum was compared to other unchewed gum and food we know our bodies easily digest, like bread. They used their new digestion vocabulary (mechanical and chemical processes) to examine what happens to gum in the mouth.

Ask your student: What happens to things that we eat that are indigestible? (they pass out the other end as solid waste— this mostly includes fiber from fruits and vegetables, but could include indigestible gum too) Does gum really stay in your system for 7 years? (No! On average, it takes 24-35 hours for food to be completely digested, and in this time the gum would be passed out with other indigestible food components).

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MYTHconceptions 6-26: Tablecloth Viola!

MYTHconceptions 6-26: Tablecloth Viola!

Today the students investigated if it was possible to magically pull a tablecloth off of a table so that everything on top of the tablecloth remains as it was. In order to understand the plausibility of this claim, students first learned about Newton’s first law of motion: objects tend to stay still if they are still or continue moving if they are moving. Students then planned, tested, and carried out various scenarios to remove a tablecloth without disrupting the table setting resting on it.

Ask your student: What happens to an object at rest if no force acts on it? (it stays at rest) Were you able to pull the tablecloth out without disrupting the objects on top of it?

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